Two youth in traditional garments dancing.

Social, Cultural and Economic Well-Being

Indigenous Peoples in B.C. fully enjoy and exercise their distinct rights to maintain, control, develop, protect and transmit their cultural heritage, traditional knowledge, languages, food systems, sciences and technologies.

Actions at a glance

How far along is this work?
Stage of transformation (Salmon)

When we think of life, it’s cycles of transformation. We think of our relations with salmon. Salmon is the chief of the water and a representation of critical thinking, taking action and overcoming obstacles. Their cycle of birth, journey, and returning to the land remind us of our reciprocal responsibility and that, with our limited time on earth, we must contribute in a meaningful way. Salmon return the earth and feed it so that other beings may thrive.

Lowest level

Stage of transformation icon (Salmon) lowest level

Started

Mid-level

Stage of transformation icon (Salmon) mid level

Planning

High Level

Stage of transformation icon (Salmon) high level

Implementation

Transformed

Stage of transformation icon (Salmon) transformed

Completed

How complicated is this work?
Complexity (Rock)

How much work needs to be done? How big is the rock we must carry? We call on the image of the rock, which reminds us of the physicality of our test of strength competitions. The heavy lifting is not just about brute strength but about how we position ourselves and use our whole being to lift.

Lowest level

Complexity icon (Rock) lowest level

Some complexity

Mid-level

Complexity icon (Rock) mid level

Moderate complexity

High Level

Complexity icon (Rock) high level

Notable complexity

Transformed

Complexity icon (Rock) transformed

Complexity resolved

Are there challenges?
Risks (Medicine bundle)

The medicine bundle is a symbol of protection and ceremony. When it comes to risk and challenges, we are reminded of the work that our ancestors undertook to prepare mind, body, and spirit for the things creator would place in front of us. Managing risk is achieved through years of preparation, gaining knowledge, training, ceremony, and mastery.

Lowest level

Risks icon (Medicine bundle) lowest level

Some challenges

Mid-level

Risks icon (Medicine bundle) mid level

Moderate challenges

High Level

Risks icon (Medicine bundle) high level

Notable challenges

Transformed

Risks icon (Medicine bundle) transformed

Challenges resolved

How are we working together?
Engagement (Weaving)

Braiding all the necessary pieces together, the land, water, and the people into spaces where deep consultation and co-operation can happen. Each strand is important, each voice is important.

Lowest level

Engagement icon (Weaving) lowest level

Some engagement

Mid-level

Engagement icon (Weaving) mid level

Moderate engagement

High Level

Engagement icon (Weaving) high level

Notable engagement

Transformed

Engagement icon (Weaving) transformed

Full engagement

Action

Year

Description

How far along is this work?

How complicated is this work?

Are there challenges?

How are we working together?

  • 4.01

    1

    Identify and undertake concrete measures to increase the literacy and numeracy achievement levels of Indigenous students at all levels of the K-12 education system, including the early years.
    Ministry of Education and Child Care
    2
    1
    1
  • 4.02

    2

    Develop and implement an effective recruitment and retention strategy to increase the number of Indigenous teachers in the K-12 public education system.
    Ministry of Education and Child Care, Ministry of Post-Secondary Education and Future Skills
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.03

    1

    Co-develop and implement a framework for the involvement of Indigenous Education Councils in school district financial planning and reporting.
    Ministry of Education and Child Care
    3
    1
    1
  • 4.04

    4

    Identify, develop and implement mechanisms and approaches to enable boards of education to better support Indigenous students, including increasing and ensuring equitable access to education and safe environments. 24 Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act Action Plan 2022-2027
    Ministry of Education and Child Care
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.05

    2

    Co-develop a policy framework for Indigenous post-secondary education and skills training that includes: supporting post-secondary institutions to be more culturally relevant and responsive to the needs of First Nations, Métis and Inuit learners and communities; expanding the Aboriginal Service Plan program to all 25 public post-secondary institutions; … ensuring that Indigenous learners have access to student housing that is safe, inclusive, and enables them to thrive personally, academically, and culturally; developing mechanisms for First Nations, Métis and Inuit learners and communities to play an integral role in public post-secondary institutions’ decision-making; and identifying legislative amendments needed to ensure all public post-secondary institution boards include at least one Indigenous person.
    Ministry of Post-Secondary Education and Future Skills
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.06

    1

    Promote culturally relevant sport, physical activity and recreation initiatives and opportunities that increase Indigenous engagement, participation and excellence in both traditional and mainstream sports for individuals in both urban and rural or remote areas.
    Ministry of Tourism, Arts, Culture and Sport
    4
    1
    4
  • 4.07

    5

    Demonstrate a new and more flexible funding model and partnership approach that supports First Nations to plan, design and deliver mental health and wellness services across a full continuum of care and to address the social determinants of health and wellness.
    Ministry of Health, Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.08

    3

    In alignment with the tripartite health plans and agreements, continue to strengthen and evolve the First Nation health governance structure in B.C. to ensure First Nations are supported to participate as full and equal partners in decision-making and service delivery at local, regional and provincial levels, and engage First Nations and the Government of Canada on the need for legislation as envisioned in the tripartite health plans and agreements.
    Ministry of Health, Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.09

    3

    As a part of the implementation of the Accessible British Columbia Act, support the identification, prevention and removal of barriers for Indigenous persons with disabilities. This includes ensuring that the development of accessibility standards considers the rights recognized and affirmed by the UN Declaration.
    Ministry of Social Development and Poverty Reduction
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.10

    1

    Prioritize the implementation of Primary Care Networks, the First Nations-led Primary Health Care Initiative, and other primary care priorities, embedding Indigenous perspectives and priorities into models of care to increase Indigenous Peoples’ access to primary care and other health services, and to improve cultural safety and quality of care.
    Ministry of Health
    3
    2
    2
  • 4.11

    2

    Increase the availability, accessibility and the continuum of Indigenous-led and community-based social services and supports that are trauma-informed, culturally safe and relevant, and address a range of holistic wellness needs for those who are in crisis, at-risk or have experienced violence, trauma and/or significant loss. 25 Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act Action Plan 2022-2027
    Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General, Ministry of Health, Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.12

    1

    Address the disproportionate impacts of the overdose public health emergency on Indigenous Peoples by: – applying to the Government of Canada to decriminalize simple possession of small amounts of illicit drugs for personal use, and continuing campaigns and other measures to help end the stigma and shame associated with addiction; – expanding prescribed safer supply and other harm reduction measures; and – ensuring accessibility of recovery beds, and evidence-based, culturally relevant and safe services to meet the needs of Indigenous Peoples, including youth. (Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions; Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General; Ministry of Attorney General) – applying to the Government of Canada to decriminalize simple possession of small amounts of illicit drugs for personal use, and continuing campaigns and other measures to help end the stigma and shame associated with addiction; – expanding prescribed safer supply and other harm reduction measures; and – ensuring accessibility of recovery beds, and evidence-based, culturally relevant and safe services to meet the needs of Indigenous Peoples, including youth.
    Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions, Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General, Ministry of Attorney General
    3
    3
    1
  • 4.13

    3

    Increase the availability and accessibility of culturally safe substance use services, including through the renovation and construction of Indigenous-run treatment centres and the integration of landbased and traditional approaches to healing.
    Ministry of Health, Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.14

    1

    Increase the availability and accessibility of resources to Indigenous partners in COVID-19 pandemic health and wellness planning and response, including the implementation of the Rural, Remote, First Nations and Indigenous COVID-19 Framework to ensure access for all Indigenous Peoples to immediate and culturally safe and relevant care closer to home. (Ministry of Health, Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions) – ensuring accessibility of recovery beds, and evidence-based, culturally relevant and safe services to meet the needs of Indigenous Peoples, including youth.
    Ministry of Health; Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions
    3
    3
    3
  • 4.15

    2

    Incorporate Indigenous experiences and knowledge of poverty and well-being into ongoing poverty reduction efforts and the 2024 Poverty Reduction Strategy. The strategy will recognize the ongoing impacts of colonialism and include Indigenous-identified actions and progress measures.
    Ministry of Social Development and Poverty Reduction
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.16

    2

    Co-develop a B.C.-specific fiscal framework, in partnership with First Nations, Métis and Inuit, and in consultation with key Indigenous organizations, to support and move forward with jurisdiction over child and family services.
    Ministry of Children and Family Development
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.17

    1

    In collaboration with B.C. First Nations and Métis Peoples, and Inuit, continue implementing changes to substantially reduce the number of Indigenous children and youth in care through increased prevention and family support services at all stages of contact with the child welfare system.
    Ministry of Children and Family Development
    2
    1
    3
  • 4.18

    2

    As committed to in the First Nations Children and Youth in Care Protocol, co-develop and implement measures to support improved education outcomes of current and former First Nation children and youth in care, including meaningful data collection to inform policy planning and service delivery.
    Ministry of Education and Child Care, Ministry of Children and Family Development, Ministry of Post-Secondary Education and Future Skills
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.19

    2

    As part of a commitment to an inclusive, universal childcare system, work in collaboration with B.C. First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Peoples to implement a distinctions-based approach to support and move forward jurisdiction over child care for First Nations, Métis and Inuit Peoples who want and need it in B.C.
    Ministry of Education and Child Care
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.20

    1

    Advance a collaborative, whole-of-government approach in the partnership between the Métis Nation of British Columbia and the Province of B.C., respecting Métis self-determination and working to establish more flexibility and sustainability in funding.
    Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation
    2
    1
    1
  • 4.21

    1

    Bring together key Indigenous urban leaders to create a provincial urban Indigenous advisory table to develop and implement a five-year plan to address the priorities of urban Indigenous Peoples, including a focus on Elders, youth, children, women, men, 2SLGBTQQIA+ and persons with disabilities.
    Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation, Ministry of Social Development and Poverty Reduction
    2
    1
    4
  • 4.22

    3

    Ministers and executives across the provincial government social sector will meet annually with urban Indigenous service organization leaders, such as the provincial urban Indigenous advisory table (see Action 4.21), to discuss successes, innovations, and challenges of supporting the social, cultural and economic needs of urban Indigenous Peoples.
    Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.23

    3

    Undertake a cross-government review of provincial supports and services for Indigenous Peoples in urban settings and develop a plan with clear timelines that will provide greater collaboration and coordination to meet needs.
    Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.24

    4

    Expand support to Aboriginal Friendship Centres and other urban Indigenous organizations that serve the needs of urban Indigenous people in B.C. while also acknowledging that Aboriginal Friendship Centres and other urban Indigenous organizations play a vital role for those that wish to connect to their cultures and traditions.
    Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.25

    1

    Work with Indigenous Peoples to build more on- and off-reserve housing and pursue new federal contributions.
    Ministry of Housing
    3
    3
    4
  • 4.26

    1

    Strengthen the health and wellness partnership between Métis Nation British Columbia, the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions and support opportunities to identify and work to address shared Métis health and wellness priorities.
    Ministry of Health, Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions
    2
    1
    3
  • 4.27

    3

    Review the principles and processes that guide the naming of municipalities and regional districts, and evolve practices to foster reconciliation in local processes.
    Ministry of Municipal Affairs
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.28

    2

    Draft a report with recommendations for how BC Parks can better reflect Indigenous Peoples’ histories and cultures in provincial parks and protected areas.
    Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.29

    3

    Establish an Indigenous-led working group to develop a strategy for the revitalization of Indigenous languages in B.C., including potential legislative supports.
    Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation, Ministry of Education and Child Care, Ministry of Post-Secondary Education and Future Skills
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.30

    1

    Support Indigenous language revitalization through sustainable funding.
    Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation, Ministry of Post-Secondary Education and Future Skills
    3
    3
    2
  • 4.31

    2

    Develop full-course offerings in First Nation languages and implement the educational Calls to Action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in the K-12 education system.
    Ministry of Education and Child Care
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.32

    2

    Co-develop a K-12 First Nations Language Policy and associated implementation plan for the public education system with the First Nations Education Steering Committee, including ensuring that the language and culture of the local First Nation(s) on whose territory(ies) a board of education operates schools are the ones primarily reflected in any First Nations language and culture programs and services of the board.
    Ministry of Education and Child Care
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.33

    4

    Co-develop a policy framework to support repatriation initiatives.
    Ministry of Tourism, Arts, Culture and Sport
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.34

    5

    Reset the relationship between the Royal BC Museum and Indigenous Peoples in B.C. by ensuring that Indigenous voices are prioritized and inform the development of narratives, exhibitions and learning programs.
    Ministry of Tourism, Arts, Culture and Sport
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.35

    1

    Work with First Nations to reform the Heritage Conservation Act to align with the UN Declaration, including shared decision-making and the protection of First Nations cultural, spiritual, and heritage sites and objects.
    Ministry of Forests, Ministry of Tourism, Arts, Culture and Sport
    3
    1
    3
  • 4.36

    5

    Ensure every First Nations community in B.C. has high-speed internet services.
    Ministry of Citizens’ Services
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.37

    1

    Provide funding to assist Indigenous tourism businesses that have been financially impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, in order to further support recovery of the Indigenous tourism sector in B.C.
    Ministry of Tourism, Arts, Culture and Sport
    4
    1
    4
  • 4.38

    2

    Provide investments to Indigenous Tourism B.C. to support Indigenous tourism, Indigenous job creation, preservation of Indigenous languages, celebration of Indigenous cultures and the stewardship of territories, and to tell the stories of Indigenous Peoples in B.C. in their own words.
    Ministry of Tourism, Arts, Culture and Sport
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.39

    2

    Work with the Province’s Economic Trusts and First Nation partners to develop a mechanism that ensures inclusion of First Nations at a regional decision-making level.
    Ministry of Jobs, Economic Development and Innovation
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.40

    2

    Ensure Indigenous collaboration in the development and implementation of the BC Economic Plan, including a technology and innovation roadmap.
    Ministry of Jobs, Economic Development and Innovation
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.41

    2

    Work with First Nations, Métis chartered communities and urban Indigenous organizations to provide funding for self-determined, community-led programs for Indigenous Peoples to upgrade skills, obtain credentials, secure employment, and develop and support community economies.
    Ministry of Post-Secondary Education and Future Skills, Ministry of Social Development and Poverty Reduction
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.42

    3

    Co-develop economic metrics to help evaluate progress as reconciliation is advanced. The baseline data will begin to address the persistent gap in Indigenous-specific economic metrics and through this co-designed effort, build a comprehensive set of data to measure Indigenous economic well-being and track progress over time.
    Jobs, Economic Development and Innovation, Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.43

    1

    Co-develop recommendations on strategic policies and initiatives for clean and sustainable energy. This includes identifying and supporting First Nations-led clean energy opportunities related to CleanBC, the Comprehensive Review of BC Hydro and the BC Utilities Commission Inquiry on the Regulation of Indigenous Utilities.
    Ministry of Energy, Mines and Low Carbon Innovation
    3
    1
    2
  • 4.44

    2

    Review, evaluate and improve B.C.’s Indigenous Youth Internship Program.
    Public Service Agency
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.45

    1

    Prioritize and increase the number of technology sector training opportunities for Indigenous Peoples and other groups currently under-represented in B.C.’s technology sector.
    Ministry of Jobs, Economic Development and Innovation
    3
    2
    1
  • 4.46

    4

    Improve economic supports for Indigenous workers and employers by increasing access for Indigenous clients to the Ministry of Labour’s services and programs, including employment standards, workers’ compensation and workplace safety.
    Ministry of Labour
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.47

    2

    Advance a collaborative approach to cannabis-related governance and jurisdiction between First Nations and the Province that reflects common objectives to protect youth, prioritize public health and safety, strengthen First Nations governance capacity and secure economic benefits for First Nations.
    Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General
    0
    0
    0
  • 4.48

    1

    Work with the B.C. Indigenous Advisory Council on Agriculture and Food and other Indigenous partners to identify opportunities to strengthen Indigenous food systems and increase Indigenous participation in the agriculture and food sector.
    Ministry of Agriculture and Food
    3
    3
    1
  • 4.49

    3

    Review existing provincial mandates to enhance treaty and self-governing Nations’ fiscal capacity to deliver services to their citizens.
    Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation
    0
    0
    0
  • Action

    4.01

    Year

    1

    Ministry

    Ministry of Education and Child Care

    Description

    Identify and undertake concrete measures to increase the literacy and numeracy achievement levels of Indigenous students at all levels of the K-12 education system, including the early years.

    How far along
    is this work?

    2

    How complicated
    is this work?

    1

    Are there
    challenges?

    1

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.02

    Year

    2

    Ministry

    Ministry of Education and Child Care, Ministry of Post-Secondary Education and Future Skills

    Description

    Develop and implement an effective recruitment and retention strategy to increase the number of Indigenous teachers in the K-12 public education system.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.03

    Year

    1

    Ministry

    Ministry of Education and Child Care

    Description

    Co-develop and implement a framework for the involvement of Indigenous Education Councils in school district financial planning and reporting.

    How far along
    is this work?

    3

    How complicated
    is this work?

    1

    Are there
    challenges?

    1

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.04

    Year

    4

    Ministry

    Ministry of Education and Child Care

    Description

    Identify, develop and implement mechanisms and approaches to enable boards of education to better support Indigenous students, including increasing and ensuring equitable access to education and safe environments. 24 Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act Action Plan 2022-2027

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.05

    Year

    2

    Ministry

    Ministry of Post-Secondary Education and Future Skills

    Description

    Co-develop a policy framework for Indigenous post-secondary education and skills training that includes: supporting post-secondary institutions to be more culturally relevant and responsive to the needs of First Nations, Métis and Inuit learners and communities; expanding the Aboriginal Service Plan program to all 25 public post-secondary institutions; … ensuring that Indigenous learners have access to student housing that is safe, inclusive, and enables them to thrive personally, academically, and culturally; developing mechanisms for First Nations, Métis and Inuit learners and communities to play an integral role in public post-secondary institutions’ decision-making; and identifying legislative amendments needed to ensure all public post-secondary institution boards include at least one Indigenous person.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.06

    Year

    1

    Ministry

    Ministry of Tourism, Arts, Culture and Sport

    Description

    Promote culturally relevant sport, physical activity and recreation initiatives and opportunities that increase Indigenous engagement, participation and excellence in both traditional and mainstream sports for individuals in both urban and rural or remote areas.

    How far along
    is this work?

    4

    How complicated
    is this work?

    1

    Are there
    challenges?

    4

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.07

    Year

    5

    Ministry

    Ministry of Health, Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions

    Description

    Demonstrate a new and more flexible funding model and partnership approach that supports First Nations to plan, design and deliver mental health and wellness services across a full continuum of care and to address the social determinants of health and wellness.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.08

    Year

    3

    Ministry

    Ministry of Health, Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions

    Description

    In alignment with the tripartite health plans and agreements, continue to strengthen and evolve the First Nation health governance structure in B.C. to ensure First Nations are supported to participate as full and equal partners in decision-making and service delivery at local, regional and provincial levels, and engage First Nations and the Government of Canada on the need for legislation as envisioned in the tripartite health plans and agreements.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.09

    Year

    3

    Ministry

    Ministry of Social Development and Poverty Reduction

    Description

    As a part of the implementation of the Accessible British Columbia Act, support the identification, prevention and removal of barriers for Indigenous persons with disabilities. This includes ensuring that the development of accessibility standards considers the rights recognized and affirmed by the UN Declaration.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.10

    Year

    1

    Ministry

    Ministry of Health

    Description

    Prioritize the implementation of Primary Care Networks, the First Nations-led Primary Health Care Initiative, and other primary care priorities, embedding Indigenous perspectives and priorities into models of care to increase Indigenous Peoples’ access to primary care and other health services, and to improve cultural safety and quality of care.

    How far along
    is this work?

    3

    How complicated
    is this work?

    2

    Are there
    challenges?

    2

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.11

    Year

    2

    Ministry

    Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General, Ministry of Health, Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions

    Description

    Increase the availability, accessibility and the continuum of Indigenous-led and community-based social services and supports that are trauma-informed, culturally safe and relevant, and address a range of holistic wellness needs for those who are in crisis, at-risk or have experienced violence, trauma and/or significant loss. 25 Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act Action Plan 2022-2027

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.12

    Year

    1

    Ministry

    Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions, Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General, Ministry of Attorney General

    Description

    Address the disproportionate impacts of the overdose public health emergency on Indigenous Peoples by: – applying to the Government of Canada to decriminalize simple possession of small amounts of illicit drugs for personal use, and continuing campaigns and other measures to help end the stigma and shame associated with addiction; – expanding prescribed safer supply and other harm reduction measures; and – ensuring accessibility of recovery beds, and evidence-based, culturally relevant and safe services to meet the needs of Indigenous Peoples, including youth. (Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions; Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General; Ministry of Attorney General) – applying to the Government of Canada to decriminalize simple possession of small amounts of illicit drugs for personal use, and continuing campaigns and other measures to help end the stigma and shame associated with addiction; – expanding prescribed safer supply and other harm reduction measures; and – ensuring accessibility of recovery beds, and evidence-based, culturally relevant and safe services to meet the needs of Indigenous Peoples, including youth.

    How far along
    is this work?

    3

    How complicated
    is this work?

    3

    Are there
    challenges?

    1

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.13

    Year

    3

    Ministry

    Ministry of Health, Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions

    Description

    Increase the availability and accessibility of culturally safe substance use services, including through the renovation and construction of Indigenous-run treatment centres and the integration of landbased and traditional approaches to healing.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.14

    Year

    1

    Ministry

    Ministry of Health; Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions

    Description

    Increase the availability and accessibility of resources to Indigenous partners in COVID-19 pandemic health and wellness planning and response, including the implementation of the Rural, Remote, First Nations and Indigenous COVID-19 Framework to ensure access for all Indigenous Peoples to immediate and culturally safe and relevant care closer to home. (Ministry of Health, Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions) – ensuring accessibility of recovery beds, and evidence-based, culturally relevant and safe services to meet the needs of Indigenous Peoples, including youth.

    How far along
    is this work?

    3

    How complicated
    is this work?

    3

    Are there
    challenges?

    3

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.15

    Year

    2

    Ministry

    Ministry of Social Development and Poverty Reduction

    Description

    Incorporate Indigenous experiences and knowledge of poverty and well-being into ongoing poverty reduction efforts and the 2024 Poverty Reduction Strategy. The strategy will recognize the ongoing impacts of colonialism and include Indigenous-identified actions and progress measures.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.16

    Year

    2

    Ministry

    Ministry of Children and Family Development

    Description

    Co-develop a B.C.-specific fiscal framework, in partnership with First Nations, Métis and Inuit, and in consultation with key Indigenous organizations, to support and move forward with jurisdiction over child and family services.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.17

    Year

    1

    Ministry

    Ministry of Children and Family Development

    Description

    In collaboration with B.C. First Nations and Métis Peoples, and Inuit, continue implementing changes to substantially reduce the number of Indigenous children and youth in care through increased prevention and family support services at all stages of contact with the child welfare system.

    How far along
    is this work?

    2

    How complicated
    is this work?

    1

    Are there
    challenges?

    3

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.18

    Year

    2

    Ministry

    Ministry of Education and Child Care, Ministry of Children and Family Development, Ministry of Post-Secondary Education and Future Skills

    Description

    As committed to in the First Nations Children and Youth in Care Protocol, co-develop and implement measures to support improved education outcomes of current and former First Nation children and youth in care, including meaningful data collection to inform policy planning and service delivery.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.19

    Year

    2

    Ministry

    Ministry of Education and Child Care

    Description

    As part of a commitment to an inclusive, universal childcare system, work in collaboration with B.C. First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Peoples to implement a distinctions-based approach to support and move forward jurisdiction over child care for First Nations, Métis and Inuit Peoples who want and need it in B.C.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.20

    Year

    1

    Ministry

    Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation

    Description

    Advance a collaborative, whole-of-government approach in the partnership between the Métis Nation of British Columbia and the Province of B.C., respecting Métis self-determination and working to establish more flexibility and sustainability in funding.

    How far along
    is this work?

    2

    How complicated
    is this work?

    1

    Are there
    challenges?

    1

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.21

    Year

    1

    Ministry

    Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation, Ministry of Social Development and Poverty Reduction

    Description

    Bring together key Indigenous urban leaders to create a provincial urban Indigenous advisory table to develop and implement a five-year plan to address the priorities of urban Indigenous Peoples, including a focus on Elders, youth, children, women, men, 2SLGBTQQIA+ and persons with disabilities.

    How far along
    is this work?

    2

    How complicated
    is this work?

    1

    Are there
    challenges?

    4

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.22

    Year

    3

    Ministry

    Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation

    Description

    Ministers and executives across the provincial government social sector will meet annually with urban Indigenous service organization leaders, such as the provincial urban Indigenous advisory table (see Action 4.21), to discuss successes, innovations, and challenges of supporting the social, cultural and economic needs of urban Indigenous Peoples.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.23

    Year

    3

    Ministry

    Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation

    Description

    Undertake a cross-government review of provincial supports and services for Indigenous Peoples in urban settings and develop a plan with clear timelines that will provide greater collaboration and coordination to meet needs.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.24

    Year

    4

    Ministry

    Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation

    Description

    Expand support to Aboriginal Friendship Centres and other urban Indigenous organizations that serve the needs of urban Indigenous people in B.C. while also acknowledging that Aboriginal Friendship Centres and other urban Indigenous organizations play a vital role for those that wish to connect to their cultures and traditions.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.25

    Year

    1

    Ministry

    Ministry of Housing

    Description

    Work with Indigenous Peoples to build more on- and off-reserve housing and pursue new federal contributions.

    How far along
    is this work?

    3

    How complicated
    is this work?

    3

    Are there
    challenges?

    4

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.26

    Year

    1

    Ministry

    Ministry of Health, Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions

    Description

    Strengthen the health and wellness partnership between Métis Nation British Columbia, the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions and support opportunities to identify and work to address shared Métis health and wellness priorities.

    How far along
    is this work?

    2

    How complicated
    is this work?

    1

    Are there
    challenges?

    3

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.27

    Year

    3

    Ministry

    Ministry of Municipal Affairs

    Description

    Review the principles and processes that guide the naming of municipalities and regional districts, and evolve practices to foster reconciliation in local processes.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.28

    Year

    2

    Ministry

    Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy

    Description

    Draft a report with recommendations for how BC Parks can better reflect Indigenous Peoples’ histories and cultures in provincial parks and protected areas.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.29

    Year

    3

    Ministry

    Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation, Ministry of Education and Child Care, Ministry of Post-Secondary Education and Future Skills

    Description

    Establish an Indigenous-led working group to develop a strategy for the revitalization of Indigenous languages in B.C., including potential legislative supports.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.30

    Year

    1

    Ministry

    Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation, Ministry of Post-Secondary Education and Future Skills

    Description

    Support Indigenous language revitalization through sustainable funding.

    How far along
    is this work?

    3

    How complicated
    is this work?

    3

    Are there
    challenges?

    2

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.31

    Year

    2

    Ministry

    Ministry of Education and Child Care

    Description

    Develop full-course offerings in First Nation languages and implement the educational Calls to Action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in the K-12 education system.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.32

    Year

    2

    Ministry

    Ministry of Education and Child Care

    Description

    Co-develop a K-12 First Nations Language Policy and associated implementation plan for the public education system with the First Nations Education Steering Committee, including ensuring that the language and culture of the local First Nation(s) on whose territory(ies) a board of education operates schools are the ones primarily reflected in any First Nations language and culture programs and services of the board.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.33

    Year

    4

    Ministry

    Ministry of Tourism, Arts, Culture and Sport

    Description

    Co-develop a policy framework to support repatriation initiatives.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.34

    Year

    5

    Ministry

    Ministry of Tourism, Arts, Culture and Sport

    Description

    Reset the relationship between the Royal BC Museum and Indigenous Peoples in B.C. by ensuring that Indigenous voices are prioritized and inform the development of narratives, exhibitions and learning programs.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.35

    Year

    1

    Ministry

    Ministry of Forests, Ministry of Tourism, Arts, Culture and Sport

    Description

    Work with First Nations to reform the Heritage Conservation Act to align with the UN Declaration, including shared decision-making and the protection of First Nations cultural, spiritual, and heritage sites and objects.

    How far along
    is this work?

    3

    How complicated
    is this work?

    1

    Are there
    challenges?

    3

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.36

    Year

    5

    Ministry

    Ministry of Citizens’ Services

    Description

    Ensure every First Nations community in B.C. has high-speed internet services.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.37

    Year

    1

    Ministry

    Ministry of Tourism, Arts, Culture and Sport

    Description

    Provide funding to assist Indigenous tourism businesses that have been financially impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, in order to further support recovery of the Indigenous tourism sector in B.C.

    How far along
    is this work?

    4

    How complicated
    is this work?

    1

    Are there
    challenges?

    4

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.38

    Year

    2

    Ministry

    Ministry of Tourism, Arts, Culture and Sport

    Description

    Provide investments to Indigenous Tourism B.C. to support Indigenous tourism, Indigenous job creation, preservation of Indigenous languages, celebration of Indigenous cultures and the stewardship of territories, and to tell the stories of Indigenous Peoples in B.C. in their own words.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.39

    Year

    2

    Ministry

    Ministry of Jobs, Economic Development and Innovation

    Description

    Work with the Province’s Economic Trusts and First Nation partners to develop a mechanism that ensures inclusion of First Nations at a regional decision-making level.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.40

    Year

    2

    Ministry

    Ministry of Jobs, Economic Development and Innovation

    Description

    Ensure Indigenous collaboration in the development and implementation of the BC Economic Plan, including a technology and innovation roadmap.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.41

    Year

    2

    Ministry

    Ministry of Post-Secondary Education and Future Skills, Ministry of Social Development and Poverty Reduction

    Description

    Work with First Nations, Métis chartered communities and urban Indigenous organizations to provide funding for self-determined, community-led programs for Indigenous Peoples to upgrade skills, obtain credentials, secure employment, and develop and support community economies.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.42

    Year

    3

    Ministry

    Jobs, Economic Development and Innovation, Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation

    Description

    Co-develop economic metrics to help evaluate progress as reconciliation is advanced. The baseline data will begin to address the persistent gap in Indigenous-specific economic metrics and through this co-designed effort, build a comprehensive set of data to measure Indigenous economic well-being and track progress over time.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.43

    Year

    1

    Ministry

    Ministry of Energy, Mines and Low Carbon Innovation

    Description

    Co-develop recommendations on strategic policies and initiatives for clean and sustainable energy. This includes identifying and supporting First Nations-led clean energy opportunities related to CleanBC, the Comprehensive Review of BC Hydro and the BC Utilities Commission Inquiry on the Regulation of Indigenous Utilities.

    How far along
    is this work?

    3

    How complicated
    is this work?

    1

    Are there
    challenges?

    2

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.44

    Year

    2

    Ministry

    Public Service Agency

    Description

    Review, evaluate and improve B.C.’s Indigenous Youth Internship Program.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.45

    Year

    1

    Ministry

    Ministry of Jobs, Economic Development and Innovation

    Description

    Prioritize and increase the number of technology sector training opportunities for Indigenous Peoples and other groups currently under-represented in B.C.’s technology sector.

    How far along
    is this work?

    3

    How complicated
    is this work?

    2

    Are there
    challenges?

    1

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.46

    Year

    4

    Ministry

    Ministry of Labour

    Description

    Improve economic supports for Indigenous workers and employers by increasing access for Indigenous clients to the Ministry of Labour’s services and programs, including employment standards, workers’ compensation and workplace safety.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.47

    Year

    2

    Ministry

    Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General

    Description

    Advance a collaborative approach to cannabis-related governance and jurisdiction between First Nations and the Province that reflects common objectives to protect youth, prioritize public health and safety, strengthen First Nations governance capacity and secure economic benefits for First Nations.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.48

    Year

    1

    Ministry

    Ministry of Agriculture and Food

    Description

    Work with the B.C. Indigenous Advisory Council on Agriculture and Food and other Indigenous partners to identify opportunities to strengthen Indigenous food systems and increase Indigenous participation in the agriculture and food sector.

    How far along
    is this work?

    3

    How complicated
    is this work?

    3

    Are there
    challenges?

    1

    How are we
    working together?

  • Action

    4.49

    Year

    3

    Ministry

    Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation

    Description

    Review existing provincial mandates to enhance treaty and self-governing Nations’ fiscal capacity to deliver services to their citizens.

    How far along
    is this work?

    0

    How complicated
    is this work?

    0

    Are there
    challenges?

    0

    How are we
    working together?

Detailed action item reporting

  • 4.01

    Identify and undertake concrete measures to increase the literacy and numeracy achievement levels of Indigenous students at all levels of the K-12 education system, including the early years.

    Highlights

    The Ministry of Education and Child Care (ECC) releases the Aboriginal Report: How Are We Doing? annually. This year, superintendents received letters with district-level reports that also highlighted the Foundation Skills Assessment (FSA) as a key indicator for literacy and numeracy. School districts are required to report FSA results through the Framework for Enhancing Student Learning, and ECC acknowledges the importance of mechanisms such as the FSA to maintain accountability in school districts for improving outcomes for Indigenous students throughout the province. ECC will continue to collaborate and support school districts to include reconciliation and restorative practices in their strategic planning and collaborate with Indigenous Peoples through the process.

    Indicators

    • Implementation project underway: Letters sent to all school districts regarding student outcomes, including FSA participation.

    How are we working together?

    Engagement with the First Nations Education Steering Committee and Métis Nation British Columbia is required to address the broader scope of this action.

    Are there challenges?

    The student outcomes published in the annual Aboriginal Report: How Are We Doing? demonstrate that there are persistent gaps and challenges in the results for Indigenous and non-Indigenous students.

  • 4.03

    Co-develop and implement a framework for the involvement of Indigenous Education Councils in school district financial planning and reporting.

    Highlights

    The Ministry of Education and Child Care (ECC) has engaged collaboratively with the First Nations Education Steering Committee (FNESC) over the Fall and Winter of 22/23 to develop policy for setting standards of Indigenous Education Councils. ECC and FNESC have a broad policy direction, and consultation with First Nations, Treaty First Nations and Métis Nation British Columbia (MNBC) has begun.

    Indicators

    • Strategic engagement underway: Legislation and Policy Working Group formed with FNESC and initial policy development discussions underway.

    How are we working together?

    ECC and FNESC have had meetings approximately monthly, or more often, since May 2022 to develop the Indigenous Education Council policy. ECC has been meeting with First Nation rights holders on the proposed policy since February 2023. Initial consultation has begun with MNBC.

    Next steps are continuing work on co-development of policy and planning for potential legislative changes.

    Are there challenges?

    Timelines for implementation, legislative changes and ensuring that First Nations and boards of education are appropriately informed of any new policies.

  • 4.06

    Promote culturally relevant sport, physical activity and recreation initiatives and opportunities that increase Indigenous engagement, participation and excellence in both traditional and mainstream sports for individuals in both urban and rural or remote areas.

    Highlights

    Provided $1.4 million to Indigenous Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation Council (ISPARC) to support delivery of the Indigenous Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation Strategy, Premier’s Awards for Indigenous Youth Excellence in Sport program and to develop collaborative partnerships with provincial and disability sport organizations to enhance reconciliation in the sport sector.

    ISPARC also completed curriculum development and the training modules for the Cultural Safety Workshop to increase awareness and education in the sport sector to further support the delivery and improved access to programs and initiatives for Indigenous people.

    The BC Games Society, ISPARC and the BC Lacrosse Association partnered to support Indigenous athletes to compete in box lacrosse at the 2022 Canada Summer Games. This was a pilot initiative to include more Indigenous athletes in the Canada Games. The B.C. men’s team won the gold medal and the B.C. women’s team won the silver medal. Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc has been selected by ISPARC as the B.C. candidate host community for the 2027 North American Indigenous Games (NAIG). In partnership with ISPARC, a final bid was submitted to NAIG Council in March 2023, which included a letter of support from the provincial government signed by Minister Lana Popham.

    Indicators

    • Number of engagement participants in programs and events: ISPARC delivered 206 programs and events to 7,643 participants, including 81 youth camps with 4,772 participants, 14 provincial championships and camps with 830 participants, 24 coaching courses with 247 coaches trained and 275 community healthy living leaders trained.

    How are we working together?

    The Sport Branch is in regular contact (bi-weekly) with ISPARC and the BC Games Society and provides assistance as required or requested.        

    Are there challenges?

    Action complete.

  • 4.10

    Prioritize the implementation of Primary Care Networks, the First Nations-led Primary Health Care Initiative, and other primary care priorities, embedding Indigenous perspectives and priorities into models of care to increase Indigenous Peoples’ access to primary care and other health services, and to improve cultural safety and quality of care.

    Highlights

    On October 11, 2022, the Dakelh Dene, Tŝilhqot’in and Secwépemc Nations, in collaboration with the First Nations Health Authority (FNHA), opened the Williams Lake First Nations Wellness Centre and 1,300 new Indigenous patients are able to access longitudinal primary care in a culturally safe team-based care setting. On March 17, 2023, a ground-breaking and traditional ceremony was held for the new Sts’ailes Community Care Campus (SCCC), in Harrison Mills, B.C. The SCCC will be the third First Nations-Led Primary Health Care Centre (FNPCC) to launch in the province and, once fully operational, will provide 1,400 new Indigenous patients with longitudinal primary care. Progress continues to be made on moving the remaining 13 FNPCCs into implementation across the province, with nine centres planned to open in 2024.

    Local community Primary Care Networks (PCNs) are engaging with First Nations and Indigenous health serving organizations in service plan development and implementation. Representatives from each are members of Primary Care Network Planning and Steering Committees, and are active in PCN governance, and in some cases, are serving as committee co-chairs. In Primary Care Network Service Plans to-date, 149.2 full-time equivalents (FTEs) have been approved to directly support Indigenous Peoples. Of these, 49.2 FTEs are Elders, Traditional Healers, Knowledge Keepers and Aboriginal Patient Navigators who will be included on local primary care teams.

    Indicators

    • Implementation project underway: Planning and implementation status is underway of PCNs and FNPCCs across the province involving First Nations, Inuit and Métis partnerships as appropriate to the local community context; at the time of this reporting, 63 of 99 PCNs are launched (64%) and 6 of 15 FNPCCs are approved or in approval (40%).

    How are we working together?

    FNPCCs are created in partnership with the FNHA and local First Nations to provide culturally safe care to Indigenous Peoples living in B.C. For the Guidelines and Protocols Advisory Committee, a permanent committee representative from the Chief Medical Office at the FNHA was added in 2020. In response to In Plain Sight, the Ministry of Health and the FNHA collectively established a provincial working group on Indigenous Cultural Safety and Humility in Primary and Community Care, with Indigenous and non-Indigenous members representing clinical committees, professional practice organizations, regional health authorities and Indigenous health and wellness organizations.

    Are there challenges?

    PCNs and FNPCCs have experienced service planning delays due to community capacity constraints and COVID-19 challenges. Health human resource shortages across the province are also significantly impacting progress in some regions. Additionally, growing patient attachment gaps are commonly outpacing physician and nurse practitioner recruitment in Indigenous, rural and remote communities.

    Obstacles to PCNs and FNPCCs implementation progress relate to physician compensation issues and PCN governance structures. Actions are being taken to address these issues through the new Physician Master Agreement, refreshed Primary Care Strategy compensation models and the Ministry of Health’s restructuring of PCN governance requirements.

  • 4.12

    Address the disproportionate impacts of the overdose public health emergency on Indigenous Peoples by: – applying to the Government of Canada to decriminalize simple possession of small amounts of illicit drugs for personal use, and continuing campaigns and other measures to help end the stigma and shame associated with addiction; – expanding prescribed safer supply and other harm reduction measures; and – ensuring accessibility of recovery beds, and evidence-based, culturally relevant and safe services to meet the needs of Indigenous Peoples, including youth. (Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions; Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General; Ministry of Attorney General) – applying to the Government of Canada to decriminalize simple possession of small amounts of illicit drugs for personal use, and continuing campaigns and other measures to help end the stigma and shame associated with addiction; – expanding prescribed safer supply and other harm reduction measures; and – ensuring accessibility of recovery beds, and evidence-based, culturally relevant and safe services to meet the needs of Indigenous Peoples, including youth.

    Highlights

    On May 31, 2022, Health Canada approved B.C.’s request for an exemption under section 56 of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act to remove criminal penalties for possession of small amounts of certain illicit substances for personal use (people will no longer face criminal sanctions if they are found to be in possession of up to 2.5 cumulative grams of drugs listed in the province’s threshold schedule). This exemption came into effect on January 31, 2023, and remains in place for three years. The s.56 exemption supports B.C.’s comprehensive response to the ongoing toxic drug crisis, including the disproportionately devastating impact on First Nations, Métis and Inuit Peoples. Decriminalization will help address these inequities, promoting pathways to supports, including culturally informed treatments and culturally safe services for First Nations, Métis and Inuit people who are at risk of toxic drug poisonings.

    The Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions (MMHA)  will continue to engage with First Nations, Métis and urban Indigenous communities and partners, including First Nations Health Authority (FNHA), First Nations leaders, Métis Nation British Columbia (MNBC), BC First Nations Justice Council (BCFNJC) and BC Association of Aboriginal Friendship Centres (BCAAFC) to ensure decriminalization is implemented in a culturally safe and appropriate way. As part of the pre-implementation work on this, MMHA worked with MNBC to hold a provincial town hall for Métis people. In addition, information packages were sent to all First Nations in B.C., including an invitation to upcoming town hall sessions and an offer to meet individually with any interested First Nation. This was also distributed to the First Nations Leadership Council (FNLC) and the First Nations Health Council (FNHC). MMHA partnered with FNHA to deliver five regional town halls for First Nations leadership, and MMHA now continues to meet individually with First Nations, with the support of partners from FNHA and the regional Health Authorities. Accounting for all First Nations, Métis and Inuit Peoples’ and communities’ experiences, needs and right to self-determination will continue to be a key part of implementation, monitoring and evaluation.

    Indicators

    • Policies/Reports developed: Developed and released a technical policy framework for the Adult Substance Use System of Care Framework in December 2022.
    • Implementation project underway: Successfully applied to Government of Canada to decriminalize simple possession of small amounts of illicit drugs for personal use to address the toxic drug crisis, which came into effect on January 31, 2023, for an initial three-year period.
    • Number of meetings and engagements held: Hosted five regional town halls for First Nations leadership in November and December 2022, in partnership the FNHA, and worked with MNBC to hold a provincial town hall for Métis people.

    How are we working together?

    Work is underway to implement the Adult Substance Use System of Care Framework and support health system transformation through continued engagement with First Nations, Métis and urban Indigenous partners. Consultation and co-operation with First Nations, Métis and Inuit partners and peoples are being pursued in a variety of ways across the four key subtasks of this action, including working groups and planning tables. A decriminalization information package was sent to all First Nations communities in B.C., to the FNLC and FNHC. Town hall sessions on decriminalization were co-developed with the FNHA for First Nations (Fall 2022) and with MNBC (June 2022). FNHA, MNBC, BCFNJC, and the BCAAFC have and continue to be members of the decriminalization Core Planning Table that has been meeting since July 2021 and to inform MMHA’s approach to engagement with partners.

    Are there challenges?

    Decriminalization is being rolled out in the midst of concurrent public health emergencies related to the COVID-19 and the toxic drug crisis, which are greatly impacting communities and the capacity of health and social service providers. Partner capacity to engage with multiple streams of work at varying touchpoints may delay development/implementation of project work. Mitigation sought via close communication with key First Nations, Métis and urban Indigenous partners supporting the streams of work.

    B.C.’s decriminalization efforts will need to take into account the unique experiences, community contexts and rights of Indigenous Peoples throughout implementation. B.C. will need to continue to work closely with the Indigenous partners and engage with First Nations, Métis and urban Indigenous partners and communities to evaluate impacts of decriminalization on First Nations, Métis and Inuit people. This feedback will be critical to support ongoing program and policy improvements.

  • 4.14

    Increase the availability and accessibility of resources to Indigenous partners in COVID-19 pandemic health and wellness planning and response, including the implementation of the Rural, Remote, First Nations and Indigenous COVID-19 Framework to ensure access for all Indigenous Peoples to immediate and culturally safe and relevant care closer to home. (Ministry of Health, Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions) – ensuring accessibility of recovery beds, and evidence-based, culturally relevant and safe services to meet the needs of Indigenous Peoples, including youth.

    Highlights

    Approved funding for Real-Time Virtual Support services in 2022/23 supported physicians and other healthcare providers to provide culturally safe virtual primary care services including extended hours and increased access to care for those who have difficulties travelling.

    Indicators

    • Implementation project underway: All Service plans reviewed and funding letters issued (100%).
    • Indigenous patient satisfaction rates: From patient satisfaction surveys, over 90% of users accessing the First Nations Virtual Doctor of the Day service report satisfaction with their appointment and over 95% of users indicate they would recommend the service to their family and friends.
    • Implementation project underway: From implementation in April 2020 to March 31, 2023, there were 30,123 First Nations Virtual Doctor of the Day encounters. From implementation in August 2020 to March 31, 2023, there were 4,483 First Nations Virtual Substance Use and Psychiatry Service encounters.

    How are we working together?

    Regular, ongoing and collaborative partner meetings with the First Nations Health Authority to support program implementation and oversight. Planning for engagement with First Nations, Inuit  and Métis health care providers and patients to provide feedback on their experience, outcomes and opportunities to improve primary care funded virtual care services.

    Are there challenges?

    Funding for Real-Time Virtual Support services ends in March 2024, as it is currently funded out of COVID-19 contingency funds from Treasury Board. Sustainment and expansions of this service will require identification of base funding to ensure it is a fully funded operation.      

  • 4.17

    In collaboration with B.C. First Nations and Métis Peoples, and Inuit, continue implementing changes to substantially reduce the number of Indigenous children and youth in care through increased prevention and family support services at all stages of contact with the child welfare system.

    Highlights

    Last year, over 90% of Indigenous children who needed protection were able to return to living safely with their families after receiving supports — including culturally specific services such as access to Knowledge Keepers, cultural ceremonies and Elder-led healing.

    Although the overrepresentation of Indigenous children and youth in care is still unacceptable and there is still much work to be done, the number of Indigenous children and youth in care has decreased to the lowest number in over 20 years.

    Bill 38/2022 Indigenous Self-Government in Child and Family Services Amendment Act:

    In collaboration with Indigenous partners, B.C. amended the Child, Family and Community Service Act to remove barriers for Indigenous Peoples exercising jurisdiction over child and family services, becoming the first province in Canada to expressly recognize within provincial legislation Indigenous Peoples’ inherent right to self-government over child and family services. The Act is a turning point that provides a path to end the overinvolvement of the Ministry of Children and Family Development (MCFD) in the lives of Indigenous families. In addition to setting out a pathway for Indigenous Peoples to exercise legal jurisdiction over child and family services, the amendments create a new Indigenous Child Welfare Director position within MCFD; provide for greater information sharing with Indigenous communities exercising or planning to exercise jurisdiction; and provide for greater involvement of Indigenous communities in child and family services through agreements with the Province. Amendments to the Adoption Act strengthen collaboration with Indigenous communities and consent-based decision making with Indigenous governing bodies on adoption placements and adoption for Indigenous children who are in the care of MCFD.

    First Signed Co-ordination Agreement:

    Splatsin, B.C. and Canada signed the first tripartite co-ordination agreement in B.C. to ensure that Splatsin can effectively exercise their inherent right of self-government including jurisdiction in relation to child and family services for their children and families. This agreement supports the ongoing exercise of Splatsin’s jurisdiction of their Child, Family and Community Services under Spallumcheen Indian Band Bylaw #3-1980 and Secwépemc  law.

    First Signed Co-created Child Welfare Agreement:

    Simpcw First Nation and B.C. signed the province’s first co-created child welfare agreement. The Simpcw First Nation now has its unique practices, customs, laws, language and traditions integrated into the Tcwesétmentem: Walking Together Agreement, the first of its kind in B.C. This agreement will inform child welfare decision making and ensure the Simpcw First Nation is involved in the protection, planning and placement of Simpcw children and youth who come into contact with the child welfare system.

    Youth Transitions:

    Since 2022, the following Youth Transitions programs/supports have been implemented:

    • Ensuring young adults can stay in their homes until age 21 with Temporary Support and Housing Agreements (TSA/THA) (Spring 2022)
    • Additional flexibility for Agreements with Young Adults (AYA) life-skills programming (Spring 2022)
    • A no-limit earnings exemption (Summer 2022)
    • Launch of the Rent Supplements Program (Fall 2022)
    • Second Intake of Rent Supplements Program (Spring 2023)
    • New transition workers have begun to be available on Vancouver Island and in the North
    • Duration of AYAs increased to 84 months (Spring 2023)
    • Increased flexibility to move from a THA to a TSA (Spring 2023)
    • Increases to, and expansion of, dental and medical benefits (Spring 2023)

    Healthy Connections Through Culture Program: This program supports Indigenous youth through cultural and community connections and provides funding to support Indigenous youth involved or at risk of involvement with the youth justice system, including those transitioning into adulthood. Foster Parent Recruitment campaign: MCFD is building a new recruitment campaign, designed to recruit more foster parents and out-of-care providers as long-time foster parents retire.

    Indicators

    • Percentage of funding increased: MCFD increased support for “out-of-care caregivers”, often referred to as Kinship caregivers, by more than 70% to harmonize their rates with foster caregiver rates. Service rates, the additional payments that caregivers receive for supporting children or youth with increased needs, have also increased this year by nearly 30%. Respite and relief care has increased up to 36%.
    • Implementation project underway: In 2022, MCFD began implementing the Enhanced Out-of-Care program. This program enables children and youth living with moderate to significant support needs to reside with extended family or people known to them and supports fewer children and youth being brought into care, residing in foster homes or in specialized homes.
    • Legislation amendment: Legislative amendments to the Child, Family and Community Service Act were drafted and are expected to be introduced in May 2023. These legislative amendments are intended to expand eligibility and services available to young adults with government care experience to better support them as they transition to adulthood.

    How are we working together?

    Over two thirds of Bill 38 came into force in 2022. The Ministry is working with Indigenous partners to develop regulations and policies needed to bring into force the remaining clauses of Bill 38. This includes engagement on changes to court processes to support the full exercise of jurisdiction, developing the Indigenous Child Welfare Director role, expanded information sharing and consent for adoption of Indigenous children. MCFD is also engaging on a fiscal framework to support Indigenous communities providing services to their children and families and expanded the suite of supports and services for young adults under youth transitions.

    Are there challenges?

    Sufficient capacity is required to ensure rights holders can co-develop Bill 38 regulations, collaborate on the engagement approach for the fiscal framework, schedule and provide regular input on transformational initiatives and have sufficient time to report to their communities.

  • 4.20

    Advance a collaborative, whole-of-government approach in the partnership between the Métis Nation of British Columbia and the Province of B.C., respecting Métis self-determination and working to establish more flexibility and sustainability in funding.

    Highlights

    The Province has committed to providing $1 million in funding over the next two fiscal years to Métis Nation British Columbia (MNBC) to support Action Plan engagement and implementation and alignment of provincial laws with the UN Declaration. The Province also committed to providing $390,000 for delivery of community-led programs in the 39 Métis Chartered Communities engaging with school districts, municipalities, regional districts and other organizations and agencies to address social, cultural and economic initiatives and activities.

    A Letter of Intent was signed between the Province and MNBC, which initiated the BC-Métis Relations Table in November 2021. The table advances a new whole-of-government approach to Métis relations as a partnership between the Province and MNBC, respecting Métis self-determination. A key goal of the table is to co-develop a reconciliation agreement that is aligned with and supports MNBC priorities, including fiscal priorities.

    Indicators

    • Agreement signed: Letter of Intent signed between the Province and Métis Nation BC, which initiated the BC-Métis Relations Table (November 2021). 
    • Strategic engagement underway: Five BC-Métis Relations Table sub-tables established and ongoing: housing; health and mental health; environmental protection; economic development; and heritage and culture.

    How are we working together?

    The Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation (MIRR) is engaging with MNBC bi-weekly through the technical BC-Métis Relations Table. Each quarter, MIRR staff and executive engages with MNBC political leadership at a senior leadership table. Regular engagement keeps MNBC informed on invitations for consultation on policy and legislation.

    Are there challenges?

    There are gaps across the public service with regard to understanding the history and provincial relationship with Métis people in British Columbia. While there is agreement that Métis do not hold site-specific section 35 rights in B.C., discussions on social areas of self-determination would help advance Métis communities to thrive and be full participants in the social, cultural and economic landscape of the province.

  • 4.21

    Bring together key Indigenous urban leaders to create a provincial urban Indigenous advisory table to develop and implement a five-year plan to address the priorities of urban Indigenous Peoples, including a focus on Elders, youth, children, women, men, 2SLGBTQQIA+ and persons with disabilities.

    Highlights

    The Province committed to an Indigenous-led process that brings together urban Indigenous leaders to create better outcomes for Indigenous Peoples in urban areas. On February 22, 2023, the inaugural Provincial Urban Indigenous Leadership Dialogue was attended by more than 50 urban Indigenous leaders from across the province. Participants were asked to explore what a co-ordinated network of urban Indigenous community leaders could look like, how to ensure no one gets left behind and how to ensure that Indigenous Peoples and values lead the space. 

    Indicators

    • Number of engagement participants in programs and events: 60 people in attendance at an information session held on December 1, 2022.
    • Number of engagement participants in programs and events:51 people in attendance at the inaugural Provincial Urban Indigenous Leadership Dialogue on February 22, 2023.

    How are we working together?

    Throughout 2022 and early 2023, the Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation (MIRR) and the Victoria Native Friendship Centre (VNFC) met bi-weekly to determine schedules, budgets, roles, responsibilities and messaging to support urban Indigenous Peoples. Urban Indigenous leaders will inform the development of the advisory table and subsequent development of a five-year plan to address the priorities of urban Indigenous Peoples along with indicators.

    Are there challenges?

    This action item was identified as having no challenges at time of reporting. Further Annual Report updates may change this action’s challenge icon status indicator.

  • 4.25

    Work with Indigenous Peoples to build more on- and off-reserve housing and pursue new federal contributions.

    Highlights

    Budget 2023 and the new Homes for People action plan announced the Province’s commitment to provide $1.3 billion over ten years (2023-2033) to double the construction of new Indigenous housing units from 1,750 to 3,500. This is on top of the $550 million over 10 years to invest in Indigenous housing provided through Indigenous Housing Fund (IHF). As of March 31, 2023, 87% of the original goal has been achieved.

    The IHF is aimed at Indigenous families, seniors, individuals and persons living with a disability both on- and off-reserve. B.C. became the first province in Canada to invest provincial housing funds on-reserve, which is federal jurisdiction. Since 2018, BC Housing opened all Building BC funding programs to applications from Indigenous people.

    Indicators

    • Number of new social housing units: 1,519 units of new social housing units completed or underway as of March 31, 2023.
    • Number of other Indigenous affiliated units: 1,084 units through the Community Housing Fund; 275 units through the Supportive Housing Fund; 55 units through the Women’s Transitional Housing Fund; and 261 units through the Deep Affordability Program underway or completed as of March 31, 2023.

    How are we working together?

    BC Housing has been engaging Indigenous partners and sector organizations over many years on strategic initiatives, such as the development of its reconciliation strategy and Indigenous design guidelines. BC Housing will be sustaining such strategic engagements as it finalizes its formal Reconciliation Strategy and moves into more collaboration and co-creation with communities as it implements the various strategy actions.

    BC Housing continues to consult with Indigenous partners on active and proposed projects and meets to discuss housing opportunities both on and off reserve. One example is the shelter and supportive housing located at 1275 7th Avenue in Hope. BC Housing has been engaging with First Nation communities and the First Nations Health Authority to ensure services, design and opportunities for cultural practices are made available for Indigenous tenants and shelter guests.

    Are there challenges?

    This action item was identified as having no challenges at time of reporting. Further Annual Report updates may change this action’s challenge icon status indicator.

  • 4.26

    Strengthen the health and wellness partnership between Métis Nation British Columbia, the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions and support opportunities to identify and work to address shared Métis health and wellness priorities.

    Highlights

    In late 2022, the Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation (MIRR), Ministry of Health (MoH) and Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions (MMHA) came together with Métis Nation British Columbia (MNBC) to develop a new Health, Mental Health and Wellness, and Harm Reduction Sub-Table, under the Métis Partnership Table. This sub-table brings together key system partners to explore ways to advance Métis health and wellness priorities, strengthen MNBC’s relationship with the Province and to explore opportunities to develop and promote Métis-specific health and mental health and wellness programming in the B.C. health system.

    MNBC has made significant strides in strengthening their relationship with health system partners over the past year, through utilization of the increased MoH-MNBC funding resources. These resources, which include ongoing annualized funding, have supported the hiring of regional health co-ordinators and other regional-centred programming that help Métis people to access appropriate care, engagement in joint working groups and development of Indigenous children and youth health and wellness education and training modules.

    Indicators

    • Amount of funding provided: In 2022/23, MoH and MMHA provided MNBC with a total of $2.2 million ($1.2 million in annualized funding; $1 million grant) to support capacity building for engagements, partnership and activities to support Métis health, mental health and wellness.
    • Strategic engagement underway: The Métis Health, Mental Health and Wellness and Harm Reduction Sub-Table was established.

    How are we working together?

    Partnership and collaboration forums include working groups, the In Plain Sight Task Team, monthly/bi-monthly executive meetings, a quarterly assistant deputy ministers (ADM) meeting and the newly established Health, Mental Health and Wellness, and Harm Reduction Sub-Table.

    Are there challenges?

    Challenges include limited MNBC capacity to engage on multiple streams of work which may delay development and implementation of specific initiatives and partnership opportunities.

    MNBC has stated that funding supports are inadequate to address community needs and facilitate MNBC’s engagement in provincial initiatives and opportunities; as well, the current funding from multiple partners in numerous agreements is resulting in a heavy administrative and reporting burden.

  • 4.30

    Support Indigenous language revitalization through sustainable funding.

    Highlights

    In 2022/23, the Province provided nearly $35 million in new funding to the First Peoples’ Cultural Council (FPCC) and First Peoples’ Cultural Foundation (FPCF) to support First Nations languages, arts, and cultural heritage revitalization programming and operations. This initial investment builds upon a landmark $50 million grant provided to FPCC in 2018 to address threats to language vitality and help revitalize First Nations languages in B.C.

    Of this new funding, the Ministry of Post-Secondary Education and Future Skills provided $2.6 million to boost the Youth Empowered Speakers Program. The program provides First Nation students in B.C. who are studying education and early childhood education with one-on-one mentor-apprentice language learning and funding to support their post-secondary studies. The program addresses the need to develop new First Nations language speakers to become immersion teachers who will work in First Nation communities to deliver community immersion programming across the province.

    PSFS also supports the Indigenous Language Fluency Degree framework that was initiated by First Nations and First Nations-mandated post-secondary institutes, and which provides a pathway for First Nations, First Nations-mandated institutes, and public post-secondary institutions to collaboratively establish and deliver degree programs in First Nation languages.

    Additional funding is required to support the current First Nation language programs and for the expansion of the Indigenous Language Fluency Degree framework, which is a unique initiative, distinct from other post-secondary language programs, that has fluency in an Indigenous language as its primary learning outcome and purpose.

    The information in the 2022 Report on the Status of BC First Nations Languages helps to inform progress/metrics.

    Indicators

    • Amount of funding provided: In 2022, the Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation provided $25 million investment over three years to FPCC towards its language, arts and cultural heritage revitalization programming, as well as $7.15 million to FPCC in new 2022-2023 operational funding.  In 2022, the Ministry of Post-Secondary Education and Future Skills provided funding of $2.6 million to FPCC for language revitalization through the Youth Empowered Speakers Program.

      The Ministry of Post-Secondary Education and Future Skills also provided $1.5 million in 2022 to the First Nations Education Steering Committee for development and implementation of the Indigenous Language Fluency Degree framework.  The Ministry provided an additional $1.6 million for a variety of community-based language revitalization and preservation initiatives from the Indigenous Skills Training and Education program fund, the majority of which was administered by the First Nations Education Steering Committee through the Post-Secondary Partnerships Program. The StrongerBC: Future Ready Action Plan commits to ongoing funding for the Indigenous Language Fluency Degree and for Michif language revitalisation.
    • Implementation project underway: Six Indigenous Language Fluency Degree pilots are underway. The first degree approved under the framework was the Bachelor of nsyilxcən Language Fluency Degree, with the first students to receive this degree graduating in June 2023. 

    How are we working together?

    The Ministries of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation  and Post-Secondary Education and Future Skills and are continuing to work with the First Peoples Cultural Council, First Nations Education Steering Committee, Indigenous Adult and Higher Learning Association, \and Métis Nation BC. The Ministry of Post-Secondary Education and Future Skills is providing funding support and working with post-secondary institutions to facilitate their support of the Indigenous Language Fluency Degree framework. The framework was initiated by First Nations and First Nations-mandated post-secondary institutes and continues to be First Nations-led.

    Are there challenges?

    Based on current funding levels, funding is insufficient to meet the needs for language revitalization in B.C.

    The Province invested nearly $35 million in new funding to the FPCC and FPCF in June 2022. Most recently through Budget 2023/24 the Province announced more than $6 million annual operational boost to FPCC. MIRR continues to work with FPCC and the Federal Government to work towards securing sustainable funding.

    Funding secured to date for the Indigenous Language Fluency Degree will not meet current needs or support its expansion to other First Nations whose languages are endangered. The Ministry of Post-Secondary and Future Skills will seek additional funding for the Indigenous Language Fluency Degree.

  • 4.35

    Work with First Nations to reform the Heritage Conservation Act to align with the UN Declaration, including shared decision-making and the protection of First Nations cultural, spiritual, and heritage sites and objects.

    Highlights

    Phase 1 engagement with First Nations and stakeholders on the Heritage Conservation Act Transformation Project (HCATP) has successfully concluded. Analysis of feedback and the drafting of ‘what we heard’ reports is well underway. The co-development of an HCATP Consultation and Co-operation Plan for First Nations has been completed, while the co-development of a Request for Decision (RFD) to move to Phase 2 is in progress.

    Indicators

    • Implementation project underway: Co-developed Heritage Conservation Act Transformation Project (HCATP) materials and resources through the Joint Working Group on First Nations Heritage Conservation (JWGFNHC), with input from the Alliance of Modern Treaty Nations, to support Phase 1 engagement with First Nations and stakeholders.
    • Number of engagement participants in programs and events:134 participants representing 98 First Nations, 2 Tribal Councils, 4 Treaty Societies and 15 First Nations organizations participated in two virtual and five in-person Phase 1 engagement sessions, or by way of Nation-requested government-to-government meetings, while upwards of 300 persons representing 173 organizations across 11 sectors/interest groups attended external stakeholder sessions. Participant feedback was received by way of oral commentary during the sessions, written submission or through an online survey.

    How are we working together?

    HCATP work is being led through the JWGFNHC, with input from the Alliance of BC Modern Treaty Nations. Phase 1 included in-person and virtual engagement sessions with First Nations, as well as an online survey, written submissions and government-to-government meetings as requested. An independent Indigenous facilitator was retained under contract with the Union of BC Indian Chiefs to deliver First Nations engagement and prepare a ‘what we heard’ report. Engagement with the Métis Nation of British Columbia has also been undertaken. Phases 2 and 3 will include opportunities for further engagement, consultation and co-operation. The HCATP Consultation and Co-operation Plan outlines in detail how the Province will consult and co-operate with First Nations on the HCATP.

    Are there challenges?

    Target timelines to introduce proposed comprehensive legislative amendments within this mandate may not provide adequate time for consultation and co-operation including the collaborative co-development of policy options and proposed legislation with First Nations, as well as necessary engagement with stakeholders.

  • 4.37

    Provide funding to assist Indigenous tourism businesses that have been financially impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, in order to further support recovery of the Indigenous tourism sector in B.C.

    Highlights

    $5 million in initial relief funding allocated to Indigenous Tourism BC (ITBC). 140 grants were delivered to Indigenous tourism businesses.

    A second intake of the BC Indigenous Tourism Recovery Fund was launched in January 2022, providing an additional $3 million to continue to support Indigenous tourism businesses. $3 million in additional relief funding was also allocated to ITBC. 161 grants were delivered to Indigenous tourism businesses.

    Indicators

    • Number of grants delivered: 301 grants delivered to Indigenous tourism businesses.

    How are we working together?

    Funding responded to a recommendation from the Tourism Task Force, a consultation process developed through COVID-19 to identify needs of the tourism sector.

    Are there challenges?

    Action complete.

  • 4.43

    Co-develop recommendations on strategic policies and initiatives for clean and sustainable energy. This includes identifying and supporting First Nations-led clean energy opportunities related to CleanBC, the Comprehensive Review of BC Hydro and the BC Utilities Commission Inquiry on the Regulation of Indigenous Utilities.

    Highlights

    Based on feedback from workshops hosted in March 2022 by the Ministry of Energy, Mines and Low Carbon Innovation (EMLI) and the First Nations Energy and Mining Council (FNEMC), First Nations leadership provided approval for three engagement tables to proceed: Electricity Table, Hydrogen Market Opportunities Table and Legislative Standing Table. Engagement for 2022/23 included the following: opportunities in hydrogen and renewable natural gas; a learning series on electricity markets, systems and regulation; and development of a joint process for engagement on clean energy regulation and legislation.           

    Legislative Standing Table: EMLI and FNEMC to develop the Legislative Standing table to bring forward provincially proposed clean energy legislative and regulatory changes for discussion with First Nations on alignment with the UN Declaration as per the Declaration Act section 3 obligations.

    Electricity Table: In November 2022, FNEMC and EMLI convened an Electricity Table Advisory Group (ETAG) consisting of Indigenous and industry leaders. The ETAG, facilitated by a third-party contractor, will discuss opportunities in the electricity sector and provide advice to EMLI and FNEMC on the implementation of activities outlined in the Indigenous Clean Energy Opportunities (ICEO) workplan for the Electricity Table.

    The ETAG terms of feference, formally approved in December 2022, provides a list of members and scope of activities for the first two years of the ETAG and can be found on the ICEO website. An Indigenous graphic facilitator captured the discussions in a visual form to illustrate plans for the Electricity Table and ICEO. With input from ETAG members, FNEMC and EMLI have developed a framework for a series of ‘Electricity 101 knowledge sessions’, that will be presented (in-person) to rights holders at a clean energy workshop in Summer 2023.

    Hydrogen Table: The BC Hydrogen Office (BCHO) and FNEMC have formed a strong partnership since the workplan began. Jointly, the BCHO and FNEMC are developing an Indigenous Hydrogen Opportunities Analysis. On January 31, 2023, a ‘Hydrogen 101 Workshop’ was presented and met with great success. The workshop had over 50 participants and stimulated many questions and much interest. Planning is underway for a second (in-person) workshop to be held in Summer 2023.

    The goals for this action include the following:

    • First Nations are fully positioned to participate in current and future opportunities in B.C.’s clean energy sector, and
    • Recommendations to decision makers for legislation, regulation and policy related to clean energy are jointly developed.

    Indicators

    • Implementation project underway: A BCHO/FNEMC Hydrogen Initiative was launched via virtual successful workshop on January 31, 2023.
    • Strategic engagement underway: Development of the ETAG, made up of Indigenous and non-Indigenous representatives with technical and subject matter expertise in the electricity sector, to provide advice to FNEMC and EMLI on carrying out activities of the Electricity Table. Three meetings of the ETAG have been held.

    How are we working together?

    The ICEO is a co-developed, co-led process between EMLI and FNEMC and is subject to the individual parties’ authorities, responsibilities and internal structures and processes.

    FNEMC and EMLI representatives have developed a strong working relationship through co-developing and co-leading the ICEO engagement process. Their relationship continues to achieve the following objectives:

    • Build a relationship based on trust and respect for each other’s perspectives
    • Apply a “solution-oriented” approach to all work to implement this engagement process
    • Set timelines, and
    • Work with due consideration for timelines and share all relevant information in a timely manner.

    ICEO engagement enhances the relationship between Indigenous Peoples and the Province by inviting the parties to engage in open thinking and transparent dialogue with a view to

    • Align Indigenous and provincial government decision-making on the policy program options, and
    • Improve the economic, environmental, social and cultural outcomes for Indigenous Peoples in British Columbia.

    Are there challenges?

    Pressure to engage on and implement activities under the ICEO terms of reference will grow in fiscal year 2023/24 and exceed available FNEMC and EMLI resources (staff resources and approved budgets).

    Implementation of ICEO activities and outcomes may occur slower than desired by rights holders and Indigenous organizations.

    Items identified by rights holders as part of 21/22 ICEO engagements are not currently being addressed under ICEO, but may be addressed in future years, such as:

    • Resource revenue sharing on BC Hydro projects and compensation from the impacts of past infringements
    • Indigenous clean energy infrastructure ownership
    • Participation in governance, employment and contracting with BC Hydro
    • Transition from diesel to renewable power generation in remote First Nation communities (currently advanced by EMLI outside of ICEO process), and
    • Jointly developing recommendations for the Provincial Cabinet on a proposed regulatory framework for Indigenous utilities.

    Many Nations are focused on power sales agreements with BC Hydro when new power supply is not immediately required or feasible at prices set in previous procurements.

  • 4.45

    Prioritize and increase the number of technology sector training opportunities for Indigenous Peoples and other groups currently under-represented in B.C.’s technology sector.

    Highlights

    The Innovator Skills Initiative (ISI), Digital Marketing Bootcamp (DMB) and the Canadian Tech Talent Accelerator (CTTA) provided training to a total of 11,778 participants; 8,536 of these participants identify as Indigenous, Black and People of Colour (IBPOC) or belong to an underrepresented group. The Ministry of Jobs, Economic Development and Innovation, in partnership with these programs, will continue engagement with Indigenous organizations to inform program development and ensure Indigenous Peoples and other groups currently under-represented in B.C.’s technology sector are prioritized to increase the number of training opportunities.

    Indicators

    • Number of engagement participants in programs and events: In 2022/23, the ISI, DMB, and the CTTA provided technology sector training to an estimated 2,200 IBPOC participants, of which 791 self-identify as Indigenous.

    How are we working together?

    A key part of the ISI development process in 2021 involved engaging with a range of organizations representing under-represented groups and Indigenous Peoples. Engagement took place through roundtable discussions to ensure a wide variety of perspectives were considered. Engagement included the Indigenous Business and Investment Council of BC, One Feather and Jelly Digital Marketing. The ISI aims to help under-represented people get their first job in B.C.’s tech sector and provides grants to help employers hire a new employee. Innovate BC engaged with the First Nations Technology Council (FNTC) to provide ISI employers free access to post jobs on the FNTC job board to cross-promote initiatives. In addition, Innovate BC engaged Jelly Academy, an Indigenous-led training provider, to provide information on how to hire recent graduates.

    The DMB program is now complete. Future digital skills bootcamps, funded through the StrongerBC: Future Ready Action Plan and delivered over the next three fiscal years, will be engaging and co-operating with Indigenous organizations regarding development and reporting on the program.

    NPower Canada, the CTTA’s lead delivery partner has been co-operating with Indigenous organizations and other supporters to ensure that the program is relevant and accessible to Indigenous jobseekers. Funding to continue the CTTA program has been approved through the StrongerBC: Future Ready Action Plan and ministry staff will work with partners to engage with Indigenous organizations to encourage Indigenous participation in the next iteration of the program.

    Are there challenges?

    While there is a low risk of not meeting program uptake targets, knowing the exact number of Indigenous and under-represented participants is difficult when identification is not a program qualification requirement. Self-identifying is often voluntary and not everyone may feel comfortable answering. Having accurate data is important to monitor and evaluate the success of program development to inform future initiatives to increase the number of tech training opportunities for Indigenous and under-represented groups. Future engagement with Indigenous partners may include discussing how to frame self-identification aspects to encourage more accurate reporting and data.

  • 4.48

    Work with the B.C. Indigenous Advisory Council on Agriculture and Food and other Indigenous partners to identify opportunities to strengthen Indigenous food systems and increase Indigenous participation in the agriculture and food sector.

    Highlights

    Following two years of co-development with founding members and the Ministry of Agriculture and Food (MAF), the BC Indigenous Advisory Council on Agriculture and Food (IACAF) was inaugurated in June 2021 and launched a 3-year strategic plan (2021-2024) to advance equitable participation of Indigenous Peoples in the food and agriculture sector and support the realization of their food security, food sovereignty and economic development objectives. The IACAF meets on a quarterly basis to dialogue with MAF on priorities and issues impacting Indigenous Peoples and to implement their strategic plan. Work undertaken by the IACAF in 2022/23 (Year 2 of the Strategic Plan) builds on research and information gathering projects sponsored by the IACAF in Year 1 and advances work in new areas. Highlights include the following: four meetings with MAF; advice and guidance on the creation and design of a $1.14 million pilot funding program to support Indigenous food systems; commissioning mapping and survey work on Indigenous food and agriculture initiatives in B.C.; hosting a gathering to support networking and strategic co-ordination among Indigenous-led organizations supporting Indigenous food and agriculture and MAF; and commissioning the first video in a planned series to profile and celebrate Indigenous food and agriculture. The IACAF’s advice on priorities and approaches to support Indigenous Peoples’ food systems has also informed MAF’s prioritization and design of substantial new Indigenous food systems programming to be launched in 2023/24.

    The Indigenous Food Systems and Agriculture Partnership Program (IFSAP) was launched in Fall 2022 and resulted in $1.14 million of approved funding for 15 Indigenous food systems and agriculture projects. Program design incorporated recommendations from the IACAF to reduce barriers to access and increase the efficacy of funding through larger projects and board eligible activity criteria that included infrastructure costs, which previously were ineligible under other ministry funding programs. A $30 million contribution to New Relationship Trust to develop and implement a 3-year Indigenous food sovereignty funding program was confirmed at the end of fiscal year 2022/23. This funding program represents the largest single MAF investment in Indigenous food systems to date and will action a recommendation from the IACAF and other Indigenous partners to transition to Indigenous-led funding design and delivery.

    Indicators

    The IACAF and MAF have agreed on three process indicators as marks of progress.

    • Number of meetings and engagements held: Four quarterly meetings (two virtual and two in-person) with council and ministry staff and senior executive have taken place, as well as three ad hoc meetings. Meetings have included sessions with Indigenous-led organizations, Agriculture and Agri-food Canada and other provincial ministries.
    • Number of implementation projects underway: Three IACAF-sponsored projects have been completed in 2022/23 to advance strategic plan priorities, including a mapping and survey project of Indigenous food and agriculture initiatives, a video profiling the IACAF and a gathering of Indigenous-led organizations supporting Indigenous food systems.
    • Recommendations actioned: Eight significant recommendations from the IACAF have been actioned in 2022/23 through new program design and delivery and three projects to advance strategic plan priorities. Most significantly, recommendations include increase funding to support Indigenous food systems, broadening eligible activities, prioritizing Indigenous-led service delivery and designing for low barrier access. Transversal to these recommendations and other advice that MAF is actioning, is to adopt a decolonizing approach to Indigenous food systems that reflects Indigenous Peoples’ food sovereignty, self-determined priorities, distinct approaches, the interconnected role of food in providing cultural, social, environmental and economic well-being and that rejects the deep, long standing colonial bias and racism reflected in definitions and approaches to agriculture.

    How are we working together?

    The IACAF meets on a quarterly basis with MAF to provide advice and guidance on the Minister’s approach to Declaration Act implementation and to work together on IACAF strategic plan implementation, primarily through projects related to IACAF’s priority action areas.

    Are there challenges?

    Risks include data deficiencies or underutilized processes of risk identification and management, adequate time, resourcing and capacity to engage, develop shared objectives, priorities and goals and adequately communicate and advance those objectives, priorities and goals within MAF and to other provincial and federal agencies and partners. IACAF and MAF co-ordination and project implementation continue to be advanced through regular meetings and project planning and execution.

    Time and competing priorities of MAF and IACAF members and adequate, secure Secretariat and Indigenous organization and partner resourcing and capacity to action IACAF strategic plan implementation are other obstacles to progress on this goal. Additionally, current funding through the Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation’s Indigenous Funding Program is not guaranteed year over year and is not confirmed until several months into the new fiscal year, which risk delays in planning and executing IACAF activities.

Additional information

The Declaration Act Annual Report was developed using a standardized process which involved participation across the provincial government and engagement with Indigenous partners.

Lead ministries identified when each of the 89 actions in the Declaration Act Action Plan would begin substantial implementation (by year) and begin reporting. This was determined by considering logical sequencing of actions that build upon each other, balancing actions with other commitments, and overall balancing of action plan themes, ministries, sectors, and focus areas.

Action content was based on information reported by lead and supporting ministries, often in partnership with Indigenous organizations they work with. The reporting information was then used to prepare both the icons and the detailed reporting presented.

The resulting reporting information was adapted based on input from internal provincial committee processes and from the Alliance of BC Modern Treaty Nations, the First Nations Leadership Council, and Métis Nation British Columbia.

The stories profiled throughout this website were curated based on a consistent set of criteria: they tell a story that involves human impact; there is balance across action plan themes, sectors, geographic region, and lead Ministries; consideration is paid to a distinctions basis; there is substantive progress in advancing the action; and there is an ability to develop content within the project timelines.

There are limitations resulting from the methods used to develop the reporting content, and inherent to undertaking a project of this nature. These limitations include:

  • Indicators are mainly process and activity-focused, and as yet not reflective of longer, more meaningful, or more transformational outcomes.
  • Standardization of report content, including indicators, was balanced with the work of co-development.
  • The project benefitted from learning while doing, meaning that the standardized template and associated dashboard calculations and representation were adapted throughout the process.

Icon Calculation

The calculation of the four icons used the following methods:

How far along is this work?

Determined using standard project schedule stages:

  • Started
  • Planning
  • Implementing
  • Complete

How complicated is this work?

Calculation: number of identified subtasks for each action + number of Ministries involved in each action + number of years in the planning and implementing stages for each action.

Categorization:

  • Some Complexity: score of 4 or less
  • Moderate Complexity: score of 5-6
  • Notable Complexity: score of 7+

Are there challenges?

Calculation: based on “risks” and “obstacles” identified for each action.

How are we working together?

Calculation: yes/no responses to the following questions for each action:

  1. Partner(s) identified?
  2. Consultation and co-operation plan or approach is in place or in development with Indigenous partners?
  3. Partner(s) involved in report development/co-development?
  4. Input has been gathered/meetings have been held?

Categorization:

  • No engagement: score of 0
  • Some engagement: score of 1-2
  • Moderate engagement: score of 3-4
  • Notable engagement: score of 5